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Wrestling > Tape Reviews

Sid Vicious Shoot Interview
Posted by Brandon Truitt on Mar 31, 2003, 19:21

I don't know about you, but I'm a little torn on Wrestlemania last night. On one hand, Brock and Angle pulled off a great match, HBK and Jericho surprised me, and we found out that Angle may only be out for 6 weeks. On the other hand, we have Brock nearly killing himself with a blown Shooting Star Press and every rising young talent being jobbed out, two of which to semi-retired cripples (Triple H wrestles about 3 matches a month. That's semi-retired to me). I'd say it was an above average show but definately a disappointment for a Wrestlemania. This would be above Wrestlemanias 6, 7, 9, 11, 15, or 18 but a cut below true classics like Wrestlemania 3, 8, 10, 14, and 17.

As always, you can feel free to Drop me an e-mail, read the archives, buy me stuff, or buy yourself stuff at Highspots.com.


Sid Vicious Shoot Interview (3/1/98)

We start out with some crappy footage from Continental as Sid, Downtown Bruno (Harvey Whippleman), and Jimmy Golden (Bunkhouse Buck) start discussing Sid’s potential membership in the Stud’s Stable faction of Robert Fuller (Col. Parker, Tennessee Lee). Sid then starts squashing some no-name jobber. After the match, he cuts an promo that makes Ahmed Johnson sound like The Rock and agrees to work out a deal with Stud’s Stable.

The interview then starts in a poorly-lit hotel room. At least it wasn’t done in the goddamn pool like the one with Shane Douglas and Francine which, by the way, is the most unwatchable shoot ever because of the poor production values. You can’t see anything, you can’t hear anything, and the match footage looks like crap.

Anyway, back to Sid. He started in the business because he was living in Marion, Arkansas, about 15 miles from Memphis, when he was discovered by Randy Savage and Lanny Poffo while working out at the gym. He had just gotten a walk-on football scholarship at Memphis State (now the University of Memphis) and his plans were to play football for two years then go pro because he was also married and had a kid on the way. Savage convinced him that he’d make $50,000 to $60,000 a year based on his look, which was a better pay range than the $35,000 to $100,000 that he MIGHT make as an offensive lineman in the NFL or the USFL. Savage ended up sending him to Tojo Yamamoto to get trained.

Were the veterans helpful to him in Memphis? He puts over how the Memphis territory protects the business while places like the WWF are lax on it. He had his first match as Lord Humongous (a takeoff of a Mad Max villain) tagging with Austin Idol against Nick Bockwinkle. After he worked Memphis for a while, he went to Continental.

Continental- He was paired with Downtown Bruno at first then, later, Eddie Gilbert came in and brought Paul E. Dangerously (Paul Heyman) with him. Bruno got nervous and asked for his release to go back to Memphis, so Sid ended up getting paired with another of Eddie Gilbert’s proteges, Shane Douglas.

We now get a horrible looking match from Continental pitting Shane Douglas and Lord Humongous vs. “Nightmare” Kenny Wayne and “Nightmare” Freddy with Paul E at ringside. WARNING: the random flashing of this match’s video CAN cause seizures. I can’t see a damn thing so I’m not going to bother with the finish.

Eddie Gilbert- Eddie was booking in Continental and taught him a lot about the business. “I’ve been lucky in the business since day one.” (He means this in the people he associates with, as in bookers and owners, and NOT by the fact that he’s made a good living off of a look and no effort.) He starts telling a story about how incompetent the owner of the territory was, some kid of a multi-millionaire entrepreneur, and that Eddie was run off, replaced by Bullet Bob Armstrong, and that he returned to Memphis shortly afterwards.

Lord Humongous- He loved the gimmick. Someone (I couldn’t hear who) told him before he ever started that he’d have a lot of fun but NOT to get caught up in winning and losing because it’s all worked. He ended up booked against Danny Davis (the head trainer of OVW) for six months. Usually, it would be announced that he wouldn’t be wrestling for whatever reason, Davis would start running around, doing calisthenics, chasing Bruno, etc. and end up running into a heatbutt by Sid for the win. He loved doing stuff like that, and I’m it was sure because he didn’t have to do a damn thing but look big and bad.

Eventually, he starts talking about how he got someone else to play Humongous one night while he stood behind them and then goes off on a tangent about how almost everything he’s done in the business has been successful and that he’s one of the smarter people in the business. I’m not sure whether to start making jokes about squeegees, squirrels, or scissors after those remarks.


We now get a Missy Hyatt interview with Shane Douglas and Lord Humongous. Shane cuts a promo about how Humongous is his cousin.

Next is a six-man tag match pitting Shane Douglas, Lord Humongous, and Tim Horner against the Dirty White Boy, “Nightmare” Freddy, and “Nightmare” Kenny Wayne with Paul E at ringside. Eddie Gilbert gets involved for a no-contest and impromptu match between Gilbert and Tommy Rich. Gilbert and the heels slink away from ringside after Rich gains the upper hand.

Douglas and Humongous vs. no-name jobbers- Humongous squashes the hell out of both guys for a quick win.

Jerry Lawler- He feels that they both have a great respect for each other. He says that he understands a lot of Lawler’s frustrations considering that he wants to book some day and, as a result of that desire, took a good hard look at what Lawler was having to do. (Sidenote- I’m not sure ANYONE could take this guy seriously as a booker between his flakiness, the fact that Ultimate Warrior sounds more coherent than him, and that the much smaller Brian Pillman supposedly whipped this guy’s ass.)

Is he old-school in his thinking? He likes old-school but “nothing in the world takes steps backwards. You’ve got to keep going on.” They’ve got to choose between going to more glamorous stuff or more wrestling. “Vince’s stuck in his groove where babyfaces should always be the champion” etc. He talks about how, two runs in the WWF before that, he would get jobbed out in 30 seconds each night and, as a result, he actually got sympathy while he was a heel. He says that the reason that WCW is kicking Vince McMahon’s ass is not because they’re putting on better shows but, rather, “they’re following the basics.”

Sidenote- He had me and then he lost me. That WCW comment makes no sense because, ever since 1996, the heels whipped everyone’s asses from pillar to post. On the rare occasion that a babyface would upset Hulk Hogan, Scott Hall, Kevin Nash, or other high-ranking nWo guys, they’d either get the job right back or Eric Bischoff would reverse the decision the next night. On top of that, this was about 3 months after the horrific Starrcade in which the babyfaces should all have gone over but, instead, only Sting did and that was after a “fast” count by Nick Patrick and a bunch of other bullshit.

Teaming with Dangerous Dan Spivey as the Skyscrapers in WCW- He was brought in as a singles guy at first, then the booking committee (mainly Eddie Gilbert but probably Bill Apter and Jim Barnett, too) decided to pair him and Spivey together. The plan was for Spivey to take all the bumps and for Sid to do all the big moves, but they realized that it wasn’t working and they started splitting things more evenly. This was different from “getting suplexed off of that fucking cage for 17 days in a row by Bret Hart.” He and Spivey had a lot of fun together.

Now we get a music video building up the Skyscrapers and their manager, the esteemed “Peanuthead” Teddy Long, who managed DLo Brown and, later, Rodney Mack on RAW up until recently.

Next is a singles match between Sid and unknown jobber. Sid wins in quick order with a powerbomb and a leg drop.

The Skyscrapers with Teddy Long vs. the Steiner Brothers. This is from Clash of the Champions 9. This was when Rick Steiner was in his “goofy bastard” phase and Scott Steiner actually looked like a human being instead of the walking steroid on RAW today. The match goes to a no-contest when Doom (Ron Simmons and Butch Reed), with Woman (the former Nancy Sullivan, now with Chris Benoit), comes to ringside. A huge schmoz erupts, the Road Warriors come out, and a giant guy in a leather jacket comes out to save Woman. Unless I’m mistaken, this is “Big Money Pit” Kevin Nash in his first major role, Woman’s bodyguard Nitron.

EDIT- It turns out Nash wasn't Nitron but you have probably seen him somewhere else... He's actually Tyler Mane, who later played Sabretooth in the first X-Men movie.

Whose decision was it to break up the team? It was an accident, as he broke a rib, which punctured one of his lungs. As a result, he went out for 6-8 months and Mean Mark Callus (Undertaker) was brought in as Spivey’s new tag partner. For some reason, everyone thinks he and Taker teamed at some point instead of Spivey teaming with them.

Being put with the Four Horsemen- He’d never done an interview at that point, as he’d always had a manager. Arn Anderson eventually pulled him aside and started feeding him stuff to say and, as a result, he thinks he got pretty good at them. Now they’re his favorite thing to do.

Sidenote- I’m not sure how good he EVER got at them. He’d already blown some on PPV at this point and had asked for a re-take before being told that they were live. At least he hadn’t done his famous “I have half the brain you have” promo yet at this point…

Brian Pillman- There’s no truth to the rumor that he didn’t want to feud with him because he was too small. The only heat they ever had was when Dusty Rhodes and Magnum TA were trying to make Sid the top guy and Pillman pissed and moaned about having to take Sid’s finisher. They bring up the Wargames 91 incident where Sid powerbombed Pillman into the cage twice, looking like it damn near killed him. He doesn’t see the problem with it as “it looked good on TV.”


They then cut to that match, Wargames at Wrestlewar 91, where Ric Flair, Sid, Larry Zbyszko, and Barry Windham took on Sting, the Steiner Brothers, and Pillman. It’s clipped to Sid entering the cage as the 7th man. Scott Steiner enters as the 8th man and the Match Beyond portion begins. Eventually, Sid starts working on the already injured Pillman and gives him a nasty press, hitting his head and neck on the cage. Sid then does a powerbomb, not getting enough height due to the cage and dropping Pillman directly on his head and neck. The dumb bastard then does a second one, although this one is, thankfully, a Razor’s Edge crucifix powerbomb instead of his normal Last Ride style powerbomb, and Pillman lands safely on his back. At this point El Gigante (Giant Gonzales) runs in and throws in the towel for Sting’s team, the only time that an outsider has called for a Wargames match to end instead of a wrestler in the cage submitting, as well as the first ever heel win in this match. All the while, Pillman is laid out on the mat and not moving. If I’d been watching this live on PPV, I’d be seriously concerned that Pillman was crippled. That powerbomb Pillman took is one of the sickest bumps ever on PPV in a wrestling match, although Sid snapping his leg in half doing a top-rope move during the main event of WCW Sin sets the bar for the injury scale, hereby dubbed as a 1.0 Sid. The Pillman bump is probably a 0.85 Sid because it looked like it killed him but you couldn’t see his neck taking obvious damage like Sid’s leg did. In comparison, Brock Lesnar's Shooting Star Press last night at Wrestlemania 19 was a 0.95 because he landed RIGHT on his head.

For the record, I don’t consider shit like New Jack vs. Vic Grimes in a “Let’s take a header off of a balcony” match to be wrestling, so that doesn’t count on this scale. Use the Buff Bagwell scale of stupidity for those bumps instead.


Was there any maneuvering in the locker room to keep him down? Yes, he’d been getting it ever since he was Lord Humongous in Continental. He feels he’s better than everybody, although he can’t “go out there and do a damn moonsault. I probably could do elbows off the top but I don’t because I’d probably break every bone in my body” (True… which happened at the aforementioned WCW Sin and is the inspiration for the Sid scale of injury.)

Leaving WCW- Dusty came up to him in Dothan, Alabama, and told him that he would beat Vader and Rick Rude and become the babyface world champion. The only string was that he had to sign a new contract which would last for a minimum of four years. Around that time, he started hearing that Hulk Hogan wanted to take time off from the WWF so he called Vince McMahon to talk. Vince flew him up to New York and talked to him, making him an offer but not giving a guarantee like WCW had. When he got back to WCW, they had found out about his talks with Vince and had doubled his guarantee. He was about to call Vince and tell him that he was taking the WCW deal when Vince called him and implied that he was giving him a deal that he couldn’t refuse. He then told WCW that he was leaving and he did everything he was supposed to, including putting Giant Gonzales over on PPV. He felt he hadn’t burned his bridges because Dusty told him he understood why he went.

He takes a second to talk about how “some day I want to be the top guy in this business. I feel that I already am, but I haven’t had a chance to show it.” Instead of a joke, I’ll just suggest you watch some of his WCW “greatness” like the powerbomb match with Kevin Nash in late 2000. That match alone blows this whole statement out of the water.

The WWF- The first thing that hit him was how many people were in the arenas watching the matches, as WCW never really drew a lot of people while he was there. He felt treated fine although he quickly learned who the locker room stooges were, such as Jake “The Snake” Roberts.

Was he surprised how different Vince was as a boss compared to when he first met him? Yes. He ended up negotiating a deal to go back to WCW because he was so unhappy and then told Vince about it. Vince made it worth his while financially to stay but he was tired of all the bullshit. Part of what pissed him off was that Ultimate Warrior kicked out of his finish, which he felt was a load of crap if he was supposed to be their top heel like they told him he was. “Ultimate Warrior didn’t do anything to me except scare me… just by talking to me.”

The WWF company line about him failing a steroid test and, as a result, kicking out of Hogan’s legdrop in the main event of Wrestlemania 8- “The piss test wasn’t even until after Wrestlemania” and Vince knew exactly what he was on anyway. “I was using someone else’s piss and putting it in that bottle” so he wouldn’t get caught, though. “There were some guys a lot bigger than me doing a lot less working out” during his last run there.

Coming back to WCW- It was relaxed and easy, except that he didn’t get the high of having a building full of fans watching. He apparently went off on a tirade one night about how no one was drawing because he, the Nasty Boys, and the British Bulldog had all come in recently from the WWF and they still only drew about $24,000 in Columbia, South Carolina.

The mini-movies with him and Vader as a team- Ole Anderson got pressured from the WCW higher-ups to do stuff like Vader’s White Castle of Fear and the bit where Sting and the British Bulldog are on a boat blown up by Cheatum The Evil Midget. They were corny as all hell but they sold out a coliseum to watch the PPV that one of them was promoting. (Beach Blast 1993, which was the Sting and Bulldog vs. Sid and Vader tag match that came from the stupid boat video)

Wrestling Sting- He was great to work with.

The Psycho Sid gimmick- “We all know it was a fuckin’ rib on me” about the scissors bit with Arn Anderson. He tried to get Vince to call him either Sid or Sid Vicious the last time he was there but the Sex Pistols had copyrighted the name for their late bassist. He didn’t mind it when he was called Psycho Sid as a face but he didn’t like the idea in general because he knows why they called him that.

The scissors incident- The WCW crew was in England for a tour when he and Arn Anderson got into an argument at a pub. Someone had asked the question of why they weren’t drawing like the WWF and Sid said that “There’s an old man holding the belt named Ric Flair that needs to get out of the fuckin’ way” (Strike one against him… Vader was holding the REAL title. Flair may have held the WCW International Western States European Heritage Hardcore North America National World TV Title, but who REALLY considered that a world title after the NWA pulled their recognition from it? Flair only won the real WCW title at Starrcade 93 because of the events of this story.) Arn took offense to that because he’s best friends with Flair and swung a chair at him. It got back to the hallway of the hotel, where Arn broke a beer bottle and threatened him with it, at which point Sid just went into his room and started eating dinner. After a while, he got pissed off at what happened, took a chair leg, and started pounding on Arn’s door. He says at that point he could hear Arn stumbling around and realized what a stupid thing he was doing, so he threw down the chair leg. He started walking away and then Arn opened the door and brandished the scissors. Arn got him into a corner and started stabbing him with them, but ended up dropping them after he stabbed Sid in the stomach. Sid picked them up and started messing Arn up… HARDCORE. Both of the ended up bleeding all up and down the hallway.

While he was in the hospital, the cops kept trying to get him to press charges and lied to him about how hurt Arn was (they told him Arn didn’t have a scratch on him). He was going to press charges until a nurse told him on the sly that Arn was REALLY messed up. Arn ended up leaving his boots at the hospital, so Sid left them at the front desk for Arn. While he was getting a drink right after that, Joey Maggs came down and confirmed that Arn was really messed up, so Sid gave an apology to Arn through Joey. Arn had told Joey that he was so messed up that he couldn’t remember anything.

Was he told that he was getting fired while Arn was staying? Bischoff told him that a lot of guys threatened to quit over it. He ended up getting released while Arn got off with a few months on suspension.

Coming back to the WWF- Vince called him and asked him to come back. They ended up putting him against Diesel. Vince ended up abusing him more than normal because he couldn’t go back to WCW, but he swallowed his pride and kept going because he needed the money. He tried to no-sell it whenever possible.

Playing bodyguard for Shawn Michaels- “I don’t think it lasted a week, did it?” On the RAW following Wrestlemania, he turned on Shawn and became Diesel’s next big opponent.

Did he have problems with The Clique? No, because he, Kevin Nash, and Scott Hall went back to WCW. He knew that they were jealous of them, which he felt was justified when he was getting cheered while the face Diesel (Nash) was getting booed. He doesn’t feel that they took the business too seriously because they just did a bunch of funny shit.

Hurting his neck during that run- He got hurt months before in a cage match and it just kept getting worse. Eventually, he and Bob Holly were working out in the gym and he couldn’t even curl a weight. When he went to the doctors, they told him he’d never wrestle again. He told Vince and JJ Dillon (then the head of talent relations) that he was retiring.

What he did during his time off- He went to California and went into agriculture, where he had a background, and was selling chemicals to farmers for months until he came home one night and got a message from Vince. He told the person taking the messages that if Vince called again, he wasn’t there and started calling one of his friends. The phone clicked and he clicked it over to find that Vince McMahon was on the line. Vince wanted him to do a couple of matches and he asked when, and was told “Tonight and tomorrow. You’ve got 40 minutes to make the flight.” He ended up wrestling Owen Hart the first night and either Owen or the British Bulldog the second night and didn’t hear from him again for weeks. Vince did the same thing a few weeks later and he ended up telling him he wasn’t interested in coming back.

Returning for In Your House: International Incident- He was a part of a 6-man main event that set an attendance record for the building and says he got the loudest cheers, which is a bit of a surprise considering how long he’d been off TV.

Did Shawn Michaels recognize him as a threat? Yes. He says that when he came back the houses went up and that they went up again while he was champion in late 1996 and early 1997. At Survivor Series 1996, “Shawn was the top babyface but only after he’d been given every possible fucking shove in the world” and, as a result, got booed against Sid in their title match. He feels that if he was a babyface and Vader had been build up, they could have done some HUGE business.

Sidenote- He goes off on how much money he drew and everything else here. You’ve got to remember, though, that 1996 was horrible for the WWF. It only bottomed out in 1997 before Austin went through the roof and took the business to new heights. Then again, in deference to Sid, this interview WAS just before Austin won the belt at Wrestlemania 14.

Was management surprised at how over he was at Madison Square Garden? “I’ve never seen so many agents cry. I wanted to piss on them.” Things didn’t change at most arenas, though, as Sid would be cheered while Shawn would be booed.

Was he surprised to lose the belt to Shawn at Royal Rumble 1997? No, because he knew the big deal for Shawn was to win the WWF title at a huge show in his hometown. The original plan was to keep the belt on him as long as he was drawing, but to get the belt back at Thursday Raw Thursday.

Thursday Raw Thursday- He’s not pissed at Shawn forfeiting the belt and “losing his smile” because Shawn’s knee and/or bullshit is not his business.

Bret and Shawn’s problems- He sensed a lot of the tension between the two whenever they did three-way matches.

Vince calling Bret “a pain in the ass”- Bret did have a tendency to come in at the last minute and change everything around after the matches had already been laid out. He feels it was because Bret thought that someone was always screwing with him, which they might well have done. He didn’t have any problems with Bret, though.

The Fatal Fourway match- He knew that he was getting the belt back through Bret, although he doesn’t know for sure that Bret knew he was transitioning the belt.

Was the belt supposed to be changing that often back then? “Who knows?” He was told again that he’d keep the belt as long as he was drawing but, at Wrestlemania 13, he was told that Undertaker was winning the belt.

The car accident- He was driving in a car across Canada when he got into an accident and ended up with a lot of weird symptoms. It was eventually determined to be a vertebrae pinching a nerve and causing numbness all throughout the left side of his body.

Coming back on RAW to wrestle Undertaker and disappearing again- The first time he disappeared was due to a back injury and he asked for time off from Vince to rest his back instead of going on the Middle East tour that was planned. They ended up rushing him into coming back for a RAW right after the Middle East tour, going as far as to call up his doctor and tell him “Schedule him now… we REALLY need him for Monday.” The doctor told him to take two months off. He then starts blaming Bruce Pritchard and Jim Ross for insisting that he had to have a doctor’s release to return even though he was willing to come back on his own. He had just come back from the back injury when he got in the car wreck, which ended up with him getting surgery.

His last RAW- He did pass out in the locker room and was numb all throughout the left side of his body. Vince McMahon ended up seeing him and asking how hurt he was and Sid ended up going off about how he’d told Jim Cornette and several other office workers and that the message apparently hadn’t gotten back to him.

The WWF painting him as an injury case- He had one back injury where he didn’t want to take more than a week off but they insisted on him getting a doctor’s approval, which caused him to spend another 8 weeks off.

The WWF promoting him vs. Bret on PPV knowing that he wouldn’t be there- He doesn’t know if they knew or not because this is the first he’s ever heard of it. (That was for In Your House: Revenge of the Taker, which became Bret-Austin part III)

Where does his WWF status lie? He’s trying to get his merchandising worked out with them. They’re playing phone tag with his lawyers about it. He can work anywhere he wants, though.

His contributions to the business- He feels that he helped turn WWF business around. He and Mick Foley drew $180,000 at Nassau Coliseum on Long Island when Shawn and Vader drew about $40,000 the time before that. (Mick is from Long Island and one of the few guys to get a decent pop from the crowd there. Draw your own conclusions.)

How does he feel about his treatment by the WWF? He doesn’t see it as a slap in the face but, rather, an incentive. He busts his ass in the gym and doing bleacher runs. He says he’ll be wrestling long after Vince’s reign as the top promoter is done. (Funny how THAT one worked out… Sid’s career ended about 2 months before Vince declared final victory over WCW.)

Would he work for the WWF again? Never say never, but if he did go back there’d have to be a lot of changes “starting with that bogus fucking contract.” He would make them promise everything they said in writing like WCW always did for him. He says that the reason he never got a prolonged run on top as WWF champion was that “I was not a product of Titan Sports, I was a product of myself” and that Vince hates putting people on top that weren’t made by him.

If he had booked the WWF in late 1997, what would he have done? If forced between choosing Bret or Shawn, he’d keep them both. (O…..K) He feels that he could have made the two of them sit down and do business in order to keep both.

Would he work for ECW or WCW? He was supposed to work the ECW PPV but got tired of Chris Candido doing the legwork and told him to get Paul E to call him directly. As usual for any Paul E. phone story, Paul would call randomly then you couldn’t get him back on the phone again if the world depended on it. The deal appears to have been that he was supposed to be a mystery partner in a match but that Lief (I’m sure he means Al Snow, formerly Lief Cassidy in the New Rockers) was going to win the match. He balked at that because if he’s coming into the territory, he feels that he should pick up the win instead of his partner. He feels the right way to do things would have been for him to win his first match then for Bam Bam Bigelow to powerbomb him through a table and set up their planned feud. He got the usual “We’ll send you some tickets” line about his deal but never received anything.

What does he think about the ECW style? He’s heard about it but hasn’t seen it. He feels that no one is more brutal than him in the ring, so it would probably be a nice fit. He feels he’ll go work there eventually if Paul ever gets his shit together (which didn’t end up happening on EITHER account).

His biggest regret in the business- Not giving Dusty a chance to make him a huge star in 1991. Dusty promised him everything Vince did except he feels that Dusty would actually have gone through with it.

Bill Goldberg- He thinks he’s got a great look. “He’s a good wrestler for the two minutes I’ve seen him.” When asked if he thinks Goldberg is the next Sid, he says “He needs to grow about 6 more inches.”


Match footage:

We get a mishmash of footage from Memphis here centered on the angles that Sid did in his year there (1994) between the scissors incident in WCW and getting hired by the WWF. It’s all crap and looks horrible, so I’m not even going to bother with a lot of it. Hell, half of it is Sid promos and I’m sure that it all makes Warrior seem like a genius.

The first bit of interest on here is a Memphis match where Sid (USWA champion) takes on The Undertaker. About as exciting as you’d expect from two no-selling 7-foot tall slugs. Undertaker tombstones Sid and goes for the pin but someone looking vaguely like the Crow-era Sting jumps Undertaker and Sid ends up DQed.

We also get some crappy UWF stuff (the Herb Abrams version from the mid-90s, NOT the Bill Watts version). There is at least one match on here, Sid vs. “Dr. Death” Steve Williams from what appears to be the ill-fated Blackjack Brawl PPV. The only bit of interest here is Sid doing his Hogan impression mid-match and cupping his hand to his ear. The match is thrown out when Sid’s ex-partner, Dan Spivey, comes in to attack Dr. Death. They end up doing a double powerbomb on him and current WWE road agent Johnny Ace comes out for the save.

More Memphis here. I’m not covering a damn bit of it because Mabel / King Mabel / Viscera the Hutt is involved.

WCW promo here with Sid and Mene Gene Okerlund. This leads to a Sid vs. Sting WCW title match from Halloween Havoc 1990 that encapsulates everything that was wrong with WCW. Sid and Sting brawl out into the crowd, something screwy happens, and Sid ends up pinning “Sting” in the center of the ring. Oh, wait, it’s Barry Windham with a HORRIBLE buzz-cut and a bad dye job (“I’ll show YOU a bad dye job ya dirty whore!”). The real Sting runs back to the ring and ends up pinning Sid.

The next match is Sting vs. Sid, with Colonel Robert Parker, from Halloween Havoc 1993. Through the miracle of bad editing, it appears that the promo went to THIS match and we just got that last abortion as a bonus. Lucky us. Sid tries to pin Sting and Parker holds a leg down… the only problem is that it belongs to Sid. When Sid confronts him about this, Sting gets a roll-up on him and wins. Sid teases kicking the shit out of Parker after the match but they just walk to the back.



Thoughts- The interview was certainly… interesting. Sid had some nuggets of real insight in there but a decent amount of it was surrounded by self-serving bullshit or some facts that he had wrong. This is the kind of middling shoot that the matches can make or break, and it certainly broke here. The only match worth a crap included was the Wargames 91 match and that was cut down to when Sid entered the match, clipping out about 20 minutes that would have been more entertaining than the Memphis or UWF stuff.

Recommendation to Avoid this unless you just want a good laugh at how deluded some wrestlers are.








 

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